New Semiconductor Plant in Kumamoto Expected to Boost High-Tech Jobs

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. announced on Tuesday that it will build a $7 billion plant in Japan’s southwestern prefecture of Kumamoto to help meet the global shortage of semiconductors. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2022 with production targeted to begin by the end of 2024, TSMC said in its joint announcement with Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corp., which will be a minority shareholder in the business.

The foundry, which will utilize 22-nanometer and 28-nanometer processes, is expected to have a monthly production capacity of 45,000 12-inch wafers. Sony will invest some $500 million in the TSMC subsidiary, which will be called Japan Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing Inc., representing an equity stake of less than 20 percent.

The project, supported by the Japanese government, is expected to create about 1,500 jobs for high-tech talent, the two companies said. TSMC CEO C.C. Wei said, “We are pleased to have the support of a leading player and our long-time customer, Sony, to supply the market with an all-new fab in Japan.”

Expecting the global shortage of semiconductors to continue, Terushi Shimizu, president and CEO of the Sony Corp. subsidiary, said he expects the partnership with TSMC will secure a stable supply of logic wafers. “We believe that further strengthening and deepening our partnership with TSMC, which has the world’s leading semiconductor production technology, is extremely meaningful for the Sony Group,” he said.

(Source: Kyodo News | Pic: Circuit, Yuri Samoilov)


Related Articles

Investors/Business
Information
Japan is struggling with the impact of aging demographics and very high government debt levels, which limit its long-term GDP growth potential to around 1 per cent per year...
General
Information, News
Many Japanese abodes in 2021 are returning to the roots of traditional residences and adding an earthen floor entryway or incorporating modern variants of the space. Japanese homes already have a small "genkan" entrance area for people to store their shoes before going inside. Now, more apartment buyers are asking for a larger “doma” traditional earthen-floored space, in which they can walk around while wearing footwear and store items for outdoor use. The demand for doma appears to be related to the boom in people engaging in more outdoor leisure activities amid the COVID-19 pandemic and increased consumer desire to maintain cleanliness in the home by separating spaces.
General
Information, News
"I was distressed both physically and mentally" in the former apartment, which had floor space of 25 sq. meters, she said, explaining why she has relocated to the new apartment, which is roughly twice as big. In the studio, she had no space for a desk despite having to work more from home, and her work and rest time became increasingly difficult to separate. One of her friends became ill due to continuously working from a small apartment, she said. Although the monthly rent for the new apartment is about 20,000 yen ($182) higher, she said, "I feel relaxed here."
General, Holiday/Home Makers
Information, News
We have been shifting and twisting and trying to adjust to a comfortable lifestyle under COVID-19. Part of that has meant getting away, even moving from crowded cities into more spacious areas. And for quite a few, Japan’s countryside has become more and more appealing. Imagine for a moment, retiring with Japan’s fresh air, greenery, rivers. Or that ideal environment to raise a family. Or imagine for a moment to generate an income on short-term rentals taking advantage of the country’s back on track campaign to boost tourism. Let’s look at how to make this dream more realistic.