Musk Foresees the End of Japan if Birthrate does not Increase

Tesla Inc CEO Elon Musk has warned that Japan will perish if it does not reverse its declining birthrate, responding to a tweet of a Kyodo News article that said the country’s population saw its largest drop on record in 2021.

“At the risk of stating the obvious, unless something changes to cause the birth rate to exceed the death rate, Japan will eventually cease to exist. This would be a great loss for the world,” Musk, who recently acquired Twitter Inc, said in a post on his account on Sunday. Musk has mentioned several times in the past his concern about a global population “collapse” as potentially the greatest risk to human civilization.

In the post, Musk was replying to a tweet of an April article by the news agency that stated that Japan’s population fell by a record 644,000 people to just over 125.5 million in 2021, marking the 11th consecutive year of decline. The drop was the biggest since 1950, when comparable data became available. Japan saw 831,000 births that year but the figure was outstripped by 1.44 million deaths, according to government data.

A record high of nearly 29 percent of the population were aged 65 and above, while those 14 and below accounted for a record low of 11.8 percent. Japan’s government has long struggled with the challenges of a graying population and a declining workforce, and has hoped to ease the labor shortage by attempting to increase foreign workers under a relaxed visa system.

(Source: Japan Today | Pic: Tokyo/ “tokyoform“)

Related Articles

General, Investors/Business
News
Just as the yen's eye-popping plunge against the dollar grabs the world's financial market spotlight, investors will get a closer look on Thursday into the underlying state of the Japanese economy. Revised second quarter GDP data, and trade and current account figures for July, will give an insight into the yen's economic fundamentals, and offer clues to whether the level and pace of the currency's depreciation are justified.
General
"I was distressed both physically and mentally" in the former apartment, which had floor space of 25 sq. meters, she said, explaining why she has relocated to the new apartment, which is roughly twice as big. In the studio, she had no space for a desk despite having to work more from home, and her work and rest time became increasingly difficult to separate. One of her friends became ill due to continuously working from a small apartment, she said. Although the monthly rent for the new apartment is about 20,000 yen ($182) higher, she said, "I feel relaxed here."
General
News
Japan, known for its rigid work culture, is entertaining changes to the standard workweek few would have predicted even several years ago. The country’s annual economic policy guidelines, released this month, unveiled plans to push employers to adopt four-day workweeks, marking official acceptance of a once-fringe approach that has gained increasing purchase internationally amid workplace changes wrought by the coronavirus pandemic.
General
Information, News
Foreign companies and individuals in China and Hong Kong are targeting Japan’s real estate, including areas of forest and land with access to water resources in the Kyushu region, prompting concerns from local governments and residents.