Musk Foresees the End of Japan if Birthrate does not Increase

Tesla Inc CEO Elon Musk has warned that Japan will perish if it does not reverse its declining birthrate, responding to a tweet of a Kyodo News article that said the country’s population saw its largest drop on record in 2021.

“At the risk of stating the obvious, unless something changes to cause the birth rate to exceed the death rate, Japan will eventually cease to exist. This would be a great loss for the world,” Musk, who recently acquired Twitter Inc, said in a post on his account on Sunday. Musk has mentioned several times in the past his concern about a global population “collapse” as potentially the greatest risk to human civilization.

In the post, Musk was replying to a tweet of an April article by the news agency that stated that Japan’s population fell by a record 644,000 people to just over 125.5 million in 2021, marking the 11th consecutive year of decline. The drop was the biggest since 1950, when comparable data became available. Japan saw 831,000 births that year but the figure was outstripped by 1.44 million deaths, according to government data.

A record high of nearly 29 percent of the population were aged 65 and above, while those 14 and below accounted for a record low of 11.8 percent. Japan’s government has long struggled with the challenges of a graying population and a declining workforce, and has hoped to ease the labor shortage by attempting to increase foreign workers under a relaxed visa system.

(Source: Japan Today | Pic: Tokyo/ “tokyoform“)

Related Articles

General
Information, News
It has been more than a year since COVID-19 transformed the world, forcing changes in lifestyle, imposing restrictions across businesses -- without warning, without bias. In the investment world, the priority became “flight to safety,” which has historically always favored the land of the rising sun. Japan stands as a self-sustaining market with deep domestic demand, less reliant on foreign trade. A country with relatively stable currency. A national environment unlikely to be affected by geopolitical risk. Here is how various sectors of the Japanese property market have maintained their stability over the last year -
General
Information, News
Many Japanese abodes in 2021 are returning to the roots of traditional residences and adding an earthen floor entryway or incorporating modern variants of the space. Japanese homes already have a small "genkan" entrance area for people to store their shoes before going inside. Now, more apartment buyers are asking for a larger “doma” traditional earthen-floored space, in which they can walk around while wearing footwear and store items for outdoor use. The demand for doma appears to be related to the boom in people engaging in more outdoor leisure activities amid the COVID-19 pandemic and increased consumer desire to maintain cleanliness in the home by separating spaces.
General
News
A recent tally by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications shows that internal migration into Tokyo topped outflow by 5,433, the lowest figure on record. In particular, people leaving the capital's central 23 wards outnumbered those moving in by more than some 15,000. This is surely a sign that the concentration of the population in Tokyo is beginning to reverse,
General
Information, News
"I was distressed both physically and mentally" in the former apartment, which had floor space of 25 sq. meters, she said, explaining why she has relocated to the new apartment, which is roughly twice as big. In the studio, she had no space for a desk despite having to work more from home, and her work and rest time became increasingly difficult to separate. One of her friends became ill due to continuously working from a small apartment, she said. Although the monthly rent for the new apartment is about 20,000 yen ($182) higher, she said, "I feel relaxed here."