Japan to Release Nuclear Wastewater as Tanks Reach Capacity

Japan’s new prime minister on Sunday said the planned mass disposal of wastewater stored at the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant cannot be delayed, despite concerns from local residents. Speaking at his first visit to the facility since taking office, Fumio Kishida said his government would work to reassure residents nearby the plant about the technical safety of the wastewater disposal project.

The Fukushima Daiichi plant suffered a triple meltdown in 2011 following a massive earthquake and tsunami. Kishida’s brief tour of the facility by its operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, focused on the ongoing decommissioning of the plant, and the massive amount of treated but still radioactive water stored there. “I felt strongly that the water issue is a crucial one that should not be pushed back,” Kishida told reporters after the tour.

The government and TEPCO announced plans in April to start releasing the water into the Pacific Ocean in the spring of 2023 over the span of decades. The plan has been fiercely opposed by fishermen, residents and Japan’s neighbors, including China and South Korea.

Contaminated cooling water has continued to leak from the damaged reactors since the disaster. The water has been pumped up from basements and stored in about 1,000 tanks which the operator says will reach their capacity late next year. Japanese officials say disposal of the water is indispensable for the plant cleanup, and that its release into the ocean is the most realistic option.

Kishida said the government will do its utmost to address concerns the water disposal will hurt local fishing and other industries. “We will provide explanation about the safety (of the disposal) from a scientific viewpoint and transparency in order to dispel various concerns,” Kishida said.

Japan has requested assistance by the International Atomic Energy Agency to ensure the discharge meets global safety standards, including treating the wastewater so its radioactivity levels are below legal limits.

(Source: CTV News | Pic: Water Sampling, )

Related Articles

General, Investors/Business
Information, News
The yen's sharp decline results from Japan's low rates against global hikes. Despite similar inflation with the US, the Bank of Japan hesitates due to consumer and business confidence in sustained price growth. This impacts Japan's economy positively for global firms but negatively for consumers, influencing Prime Minister Kishida's economic strategies.
General, Investors/Business
Information, News
Japanese land prices fell for the second straight year as the country's closed borders and state of emergency curbs to combat the coronavirus pandemic hit demand for new restaurants and hotels...
General
Information, News
Japan considers revamping tax-free shopping for foreign visitors amid concerns of resale abuse. Proposals suggest a shift where tourists pay tax-inclusive prices and seek refunds later, aiming to deter the resale of tax-free items at regular prices abroad. Formal talks may commence during the fiscal 2024 tax review, addressing the issue of tax-free goods being profited from outside Japan's borders.
General
Information, News
Japan's real estate market is witnessing a substantial influx of foreign investors who are looking to capitalize on the country's investment appeal. These investors are actively seeking properties such as logistics facilities and offices, buoyed by Japan's low interest rates, which make financing their purchases highly advantageous.