Foreign Investments in Warehouses and Offices
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Foreign real estate buyers are turning to Japan as an investment haven, hunting for properties like logistics facilities and offices while taking advantage of the country’s low interest rates to finance their purchases.

The opportunity in warehouses and other storage spaces has been created by tighter restrictions on delivery drivers’ working hours, a coming change intended to safeguard safety and health. Office buildings have benefited as Japanese workers have largely returned to the office.

Source: NikkeiAsia

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